The Simple Polish Nun

The story of a young Polish woman, Faustyna Kowalska, whose visions of Jesus Christ inspired devotion to the Divine Mercy is compelling, especially for those of us who have felt “led” to perform an act of mercy for someone else. Now, her story has been brought to the big screen in a very limited engagement in theaters in the U.S.

At just seven years old, Faustina felt a calling to the religious life. At 19, she had a vision of the suffering Jesus. Without even asking her parents’ permission, she responded by boarding a train for Warsaw with only the clothes on her back in order to join a convent. After multiple refusals, one mother superior finally gave her a chance if she was willing to work as a housemaid and pay her own way.

Movie portrayal of St. Faustina

Faustina eventually met the priest who was to become her confessor and encouraged her to write down in her diary her mystical experiences with the Christ Jesus. She wrote that Jesus appeared to her wearing a white garment with red and pale rays emanating from His heart, then ask her to paint an image according to the pattern you see, with the signature “Jesus, I trust in You.” He promised that those who venerate the image will not perish. It was done, even thought she did not know how to paint.

How the image came to be painted, and how its image has changed the lives of those who venerate it up to this day is revealed in the movie Love and Mercy, now at local theaters for a very limited time. Access The Diary of Saint Maria Faustina Kowalska book.

The Christmas season is an excellent time to learn and reflect on our own relationship with the Christ Jesus story. See the movie trailer and make up your own mind about whether you feel “led” to know more. Just click the Watch Trailer button in the Love and Mercy link above.

Blessings on this Christmas Season from all of us at the Stewardship Foundation.

Abortion is Morally Bad

In February 2019, the Knights of Columbus, a worldwide fraternal benefit society founded in 1882, conducted what they named, The Marist Poll. The survey polled 1,008 adults in the U.S. randomly selected from a list of telephone exchanges from throughout the nation in proportion to its population. In other words, the poll was not conducted to include or exclude any race, religion, income, political leaning, age, gender, or geographical element. The results were statically significant within + or – 3.5%—as are all properly conducted surveys.

On the issues of abortion, do you consider yourself pro-life or pro-choice?

Pro-life 47%
Pro-choice 47%
Unsure 6%

The same question in October 2008 returned 44% pro-life and 50% pro-choice — a statistical uptick of 6% for pro-life. Unsure in 2008 was the same, 6%.

On the question “Do you think abortion should generally be legal or generally illegal during the last three months of pregnancy, the overwhelming majority (between 85% to 57%) said no, it should not be legal. And interestingly, the percentage was the same for men and for women (71% said illegal) — a sharp rise from January 2019 when only 38% said illegal.

Of course, this is only one poll and considering how well pollsters do determining election outcomes, we will need to wait for future polls to collaborate the results.

The Stewardship Foundation takes a stand to respect all life, unconditionally, and will never sway from our conviction. We believe that induced abortion is not healthcare but murder.

We believe that a fetus is not a possibility, it is a person, not fully formed, but with all it needs to become that way — and it has a soul. An unwanted pregnancy is unwanted by the birth mother, but it is wanted by another couple who has not been able to become pregnant.

At the Stewardship Foundation, we believe in the sanctity of human life, marriage and sexual morality, and religious freedom and the rights of conscience. If you agree, we’d love to hear from you. If you have a friend or colleague who you think might want to speak with us, please pass this along.

In the Midst of the Border Crisis

We believe… that it is our responsibility to care for the poor, the sick and the disadvantaged, and to use our talents for the betterment of mankind through education, opportunity and freedom.

Stewardship Foundation Credo #6

The Stewardship Foundation was founded on six defining principles that remain today our guiding tenets. There are currently 11.2 million unauthorized immigrants residing in the United States (Pew Research Center, 12 June 2019), and the number grows by hundreds of thousands as those who feel compelled to come with the promise of employment stream over the border. Our reaction is a mix of compassion, confusion, and too often political rhetoric. But if we believe in our Principle #6 (above), can we deny these people the education, opportunity and freedom that we hope for all mankind?

On one hand, we are alarmed at the risks that they take from dangerous smugglers looking to exploit these mostly low-skilled workers and their families during their trek north. On the other hand, our immigration policy exists to maintain an orderly and rational means for people to immigrate here, for the betterment of all (the common good).

The Church teaches that good government has two duties: welcome the foreigner out of charity and respect for the human person, and to secure one’s border and enforce the law for the sake of the common good. 

The U.S. Catholic Bishops’ pastoral letter of 2003 “Strangers No Longer: Together on the Journey of Hope” notes that all people have the right to economic freedom—the right to work for a living and support their families. In 2003, they could not have foreseen the murder, crime, violence and corruption that would befall Honduras, or that schools would grow so expensive there that families would flee to the U.S. simply to educate their children so they can have a better life. 

Even on the heels of 9/11 and the real threats of terrorism, the Bishops perhaps could not foretell the depth of the drug crisis and its ever-greater impact on both Mexicans and Americans as more and more drugs are illegally funneled across the border.

While we struggle to reconcile these things, our hope lies in more targeted, humane, and proportional enforcement measures; cooperation of the countries of Latin America; and the courage to stand by our treasured U.S. Constitution, our laws and leaders while we collectively figure this out.